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dc.contributor.authorLagalo, Bryan Alan
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T21:13:12Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T21:13:12Z
dc.date.issued2013-08
dc.identifier.otherlagalo_bryan_a_201308_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/lagalo_bryan_a_201308_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29097
dc.description.abstractMovie studios rarely release two films with large budgets, wide theater releases, or similar genres on the same weekend. One possible explanation is that studios tacitly collude by spacing out movie release dates. This type of collusion can be categorized as an alternating-periods monopoly (APM), where firms take turns as a monopolist rather than collectively acting as a monopolist each period. Using duration analysis and a Weibull hazard function, I find evidence that, during the sample period 2005-2009, studios spaced-out releases of films costing more than $100 million, or that were released in more than 3,250 theaters, sequels, similar genres, or assigned a G-rating.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectTacit collusion
dc.subjectAlternating-periods monopoly
dc.subjectMovie industry
dc.subjectWeibull hazard function
dc.subjectDuration analysis
dc.titleTacit collusion and movie release dates
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEconomics
dc.description.majorEconomics
dc.description.advisorDavid Kamerschen
dc.description.committeeDavid Kamerschen
dc.description.committeeRonald Warren, Jr.
dc.description.committeeGregory Trandel


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