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dc.contributor.authorCombs, Brandon Joshua
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T21:05:35Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T21:05:35Z
dc.date.issued2013-08
dc.identifier.othercombs_brandon_j_201308_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/combs_brandon_j_201308_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/29007
dc.description.abstractThere is a shark attack occurring worldwide. The attack is not one of sharks, but rather an attack on sharks to procure their fins. The shark finning industry is a multi-million dollar operation that persists in the world’s oceans. It is largely unmanaged, unmonitored and unsustainable. Costa Rica is one of the tropical countries where supply of shark fins originates. That supply was the inspiration for this study, which examines ecology, human understanding of shark-finning, politics, conservation, and shark biology. The purpose of this study was to gauge ecological conditions in Costa Rica, as well as survey residents and tourists in Costa Rica about their understanding of this critical topic for sustainability.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectSharks
dc.subjectFinning
dc.subjectShark-fin soup
dc.subjectFishing
dc.subjectConservation
dc.subjectMarine Ecology
dc.subjectPolitical Ecology
dc.subjectEnvironmental protection
dc.titleA shark attack
dc.title.alternativeimplications of fin trade in a Pacific Costa Rican seascape
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentGeography
dc.description.majorGeography
dc.description.advisorFausto Sarmiento
dc.description.committeeFausto Sarmiento
dc.description.committeeRonald Carroll
dc.description.committeeElgene Box


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