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dc.contributor.authorBerger, Brian Scott
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T21:05:07Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T21:05:07Z
dc.date.issued2013-08
dc.identifier.otherberger_brian_s_201308_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/berger_brian_s_201308_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28972
dc.description.abstractResearch indicates that personality plays a significant role in business (Judge & Bono, 2000), education (Rushton, Morgan, & Richard, 2007), and military (McCormack & Mellor, 2002) leadership. Since little research has investigated the role of personality in coaching (Frederick & Morrison, 1999; Hendry, 1974; Markland & Martinek, 1988; McCarthy, 1973), the purpose of this study was to assess the power of personality in predicting a coach’s success. In addition, other variables that differentiate coaching success, such as age (Dimec & Kajtna, 2009), coaching experience (Schempp & McCullick, 2010), playing experience (Trudel & Gilbert, 2006), sport level (Jambor & Zhang, 1997), education level (Dae-Woo, Min-Haeng, & Young-Kum, 2005), and gender (Chelladurai & Carron, 1979) were identified and analyzed. The study addressed three research questions: a) was there a statistically significant relationship between personality and coaching success, b) was there a statistically significant relationship between personality and coaching differentiation variables, and c) which of the differentiation variables could be used in a regression formula to predict a coach’s winning percentage? Participants were head high school and college coaches with at least 5 years of coaching experience. The NEO-FFI-3 inventory was administered to the participants. Multiple linear regression and correlation analyses were primarily used to analyze the relationship between the variables and coaching success. The notable results revealed several findings: a) personality did not appear to have any predictive power on coaching success, b) head coaching experience was the only variable which reliably predicted coaching success, and c) female coaches were more agreeable than and as successful as male coaches. Future research should primarily focus on the extent to which a general personality profile correlates to specific behavior.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectCoaching (athletics)
dc.subjectPersonality
dc.subjectExperience
dc.subjectGender
dc.titleThe power of personality in predicting coaching success
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentKinesiology
dc.description.majorKinesiology
dc.description.advisorPaul Schempp
dc.description.committeePaul Schempp
dc.description.committeeBryan McCullick
dc.description.committeeBilly Hawkins
dc.description.committeeTed Baumgartner


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