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dc.contributor.authorAllen, Jasmin Nicole
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T21:04:56Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T21:04:56Z
dc.date.issued2013-08
dc.identifier.otherallen_jasmin_n_201308_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/allen_jasmin_n_201308_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28959
dc.description.abstractAfrican American adolescents are disproportionately represented in the juvenile justice and encounter various race-related challenges. While there are conflicting theories that attempt to explain disproportionate minority confinement, scholars generally agree that African Americans are differentially impacted by race-related variables. There is a dearth of research examining the effects of race-related events and attitudes among African American juvenile offenders. This study examined the risk, compensatory, and protective effects of racial identity, internalized racism, discrimination distress, and parent racial socialization on various outcomes with African American adolescents in community and detention center settings. Correlation, hierarchical regression, and logistic regression analyses were conducted to test several hypotheses. Results of the statistical analyses identified interrelationships between several variables. Results also identified discrimination distress as a risk factor and racial identity as a protective factor for internalizing problems and emotional symptoms. Various models were also able to predict recidivism. Limitations and future directions for research are discussed.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAfrican American
dc.subjectJuvenile Offenders
dc.subjectRacial Identity
dc.subjectInternalized Racism
dc.subjectDiscrimination Distress
dc.subjectRacial Socialization
dc.subjectEmotional Symptoms
dc.subjectRecidivism
dc.subjectInternalizing Problems
dc.subjectSchool Problems
dc.titleRacial identity, internalized racism, discrimination distress, and parent racial socialization
dc.title.alternativerisk and resilience for African American juvenile offenders
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentCounseling and Human Development Services
dc.description.majorCounseling Psychology
dc.description.advisorGeorgia B. Calhoun
dc.description.committeeGeorgia B. Calhoun
dc.description.committeeBrian A. Glaser
dc.description.committeeEdward Delgado-Romero


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