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dc.contributor.authorSpell, Hannah Burk
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T21:04:16Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T21:04:16Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.otherspell_hannah_b_201305_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/spell_hannah_b_201305_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28914
dc.description.abstractThis research investigates the influence of a work group’s developmental climate on individuals’ organizational commitment, engagement, and perceived competence and whether these attitudes mediate the relationship between developmental climate and employee turnover and performance. Developmental climate was measured using individual ratings of coworker and mentor support. The two support measures were group mean centered and aggregated for each location and used as latent indicators of the climate construct in a multilevel structural equation model. Developmental climate was positively related to all three individual attitude variables. Both organizational commitment and perceived competence demonstrated a mediating effect between developmental climate and turnover and performance, respectively. Theoretical implications, limitations, and future research are discussed.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectDevelopmental Climate
dc.subjectPositive Work Relationships
dc.subjectMentoring
dc.subjectCoworker Support
dc.titleOne big happy family
dc.title.alternativeexamining positive relationships at work as a developmental climate
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorLillian Eby
dc.description.committeeLillian Eby
dc.description.committeeRobert Vandenberg
dc.description.committeeBrian Hoffman


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