Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSanders, Matthew Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T21:03:53Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T21:03:53Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.othersanders_matthew_a_201305_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/sanders_matthew_a_201305_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28887
dc.description.abstractConservatives and liberals may differ in how they construe decision making. Conservatives tend to value consensus, whereas liberals tend to value novelty (Nathanson & Becker, 1981, Shook & Fazio, 2009). Decision making can be construed as intellective or judgmental (Laughlin, 1980). Intellective (i.e. accuracy-focused) decisions tend to be informed by objective sources of information, whereas judgmental (i.e. consensus-focused) decisions tend to be informed by normative sources of information (Kaplan & Miller, 1987). Two studies tested whether conservatives and liberals differed in their construal of decision making by assessing how they evaluated sources of information and used information in their judgments. In Experiment 1, participants were presented with a moral dilemma and were asked to rate objective and normative sources of information that could inform a decision in that dilemma. In Experiment 2, participants were presented with a decision making dilemma and were provided with objective or normative anchors for their judgments. Results showed that conservatives tended to positively evaluate and use normative sources of information, whereas liberals positively evaluated objective sources of information. The results suggest differences in how decisions are construed across political orientation and suggest that further studies are needed to assess how information from different sources is used in judgments.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectpolitical orientation
dc.subjectdecision making
dc.subjectconformity
dc.subjectinformation search
dc.subjectintellective versus judgmental tasks
dc.titleThe problem or the people
dc.title.alternativewhat conservatives and liberals want to know when making decisions
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorLeonard L. Martin
dc.description.committeeLeonard L. Martin
dc.description.committeeMichelle vanDellen
dc.description.committeeAdam Goodie


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record