Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMoss, Lauren Jeanne
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T21:03:07Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T21:03:07Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.othermoss_lauren_j_201305_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/moss_lauren_j_201305_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28836
dc.description.abstractStudents of color may encounter multiple barriers to education, which could include: negative academic experiences, feelings of isolation, power differences, increased discipline referrals, low retention rates, and graduation rates (Holcomb-McCoy, 2007; Losen, 2011). Current scholarship addresses the school counselors’ role regarding strategies and suggestions to addressing inequities that exists in schools (Bailey, Getch, & Chen-Hayes, 2003; Cox & Lee, 2007; Holcomb-McCoy, 2007; Singh, Urbano, Haston, & McMahan, 2010). The essence of how school counselors emerge as racial justice allies to students of color, however, is absent from the current scholarly conversation in the field of school counseling. A better understanding of this phenomenon may offer a poignant avenue through which White school counselors can take steps towards promoting a socially just world. This study engages Critical Race and Relational Cultural theories to theoretically frame a phenomenological methodological approach to research the essence of how White school counselors experience racial justice ally identity (Groenewald, 2004; Hays & Singh, 2012). The findings of this exploratory study provide insight into the lived experiences of White school counselors as they develop in their ally identity and advocacy with and for the students of color with whom they work. This study thoroughly explores the phenomenon of White school counselors as racial justice allies, points to recommendations for school counselors and counselor educators, and offers researcher reflection on the phenomenological qualitative research process.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectSchool Counseling
dc.subjectWhite
dc.subjectRacial Justice Allies
dc.subjectCritical Race Theory
dc.subjectRelational Cultural Theory
dc.subjectAdvocacy
dc.subjectPhenomenology
dc.titleDeveloping trust and leveraging privilege
dc.title.alternativewhite school counselors as aspiring racial justice allies
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentCounseling and Human Development Services
dc.description.majorCounseling and Student Personnel Services
dc.description.advisorAnneliese Singh
dc.description.committeeAnneliese Singh
dc.description.committeePamela O. Paisley
dc.description.committeeNatoya Haskins


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record