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dc.contributor.authorKemling, Michael Paul
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T21:02:14Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T21:02:14Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.otherkemling_michael_p_201305_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/kemling_michael_p_201305_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28779
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines how Michelangelo advanced his artistic and social identities through portraits executed by his closest friends. By placing these portraits within their respective historical contexts, this study sheds light on how Michelangelo controlled his image in a fashion analogous to his patrons. Above all, the portraits of Michelangelo are an extension of his desire remove himself from the traditional social constructs for an artist in order to achieve artistic autonomy. Michelangelo as the patron of portraits has been previously overlooked, which may have been a result of their unusual nature in the context of self-images of artists and Michelangelo’s relationship with portraiture. Beginning in the second decade of the sixteenth century and until his death in 1564, Michelangelo oversaw the production of his portrait in various media, including drawings, paintings, prints, sculptures, and a portrait medal. The earliest portraits of the artist by Fra Bartolommeo and Guiliano Bugiardini visually connect Michelangelo to the illustrious artistic traditions of Florence. In particular, Bugiardini’s portrait represents Michelangelo in a specific garment that has been misunderstood in the modern literature. Twenty years later, Michelangelo asked either Jacopino del Conte or Daniele da Volterra to execute a painted portrait that reinforced Michelangelo’s conception of his social status as an artist of noble birth. This portrait marks the beginning of a period in which Michelangelo directly participated in the construction of his social identity through painted and engraved portraits, numerous publications addressing Michelangelo’s artistic theories, and two biographies. Late in his life, Michelangelo turned to Leone Leoni to execute his portrait medal, which aimed to advance both his social and religious aspirations. After the artist’s death, Daniele da Volterra and Lionardo Buonarroti desperately tried to maintain Michelangelo’s wishes for his image through a funerary monument that would have been adorned with a bronze bust by Daniele. Like the tomb, Michelangelo’s image was quickly appropriated by Giorgio Vasari, who used Michelangelo and his appearance as an emblem for both artistic genius and accomplishment.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectMichelangelo
dc.subjectFra Bartolommeo
dc.subjectGiuliano Bugiardini
dc.subjectportrait
dc.subjectportraiture
dc.subjectartist portrait
dc.subjectself-portrait
dc.subjectartistic identity
dc.subjectsocial identity
dc.subjectFlorence
dc.subjectRome
dc.subjectOrcagna
dc.subjectDaniele da Volterra
dc.subjectJacopino del Conte
dc.subjectbirthday
dc.subjectfuneral
dc.subjectbust
dc.subjectGiulio Bonasone
dc.subjectpoetry
dc.subjectSt. Thomas Aquinas
dc.subjectGiorgio Vasari
dc.subjectAscanio Condivi
dc.subjectillness
dc.titleMichelangelo as patron
dc.title.alternativethe construction of his artistic and social identities through portraiture
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentArt
dc.description.majorArt History
dc.description.advisorShelley E. Zuraw
dc.description.committeeShelley E. Zuraw
dc.description.committeeJanice Simon
dc.description.committeeAsen Kirin
dc.description.committeeWilliam U. Eiland
dc.description.committeeMark Abbe


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