Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDupriest, Benjamin Moore
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T21:01:31Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T21:01:31Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.otherdupriest_benjamin_m_201305_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/dupriest_benjamin_m_201305_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28719
dc.description.abstractNew Orleans native Lil Wayne began his professional career in rap music at the age of eleven. Since then, he has garnered sixty-four number one hits on the Billboard hot 100 chart, the most ever by a rapper. Lil Wayne is among the most controversial artists of the dirty South hip hop scene, which has been accused of creating the most overtly problematic and self-degrading images in hip-hop culture. This document seeks to examine Lil Wayne in the context of these criticisms and controversies. Looking at the broader paradigms of Southern hip hop musical style, lyrical subjectivity and visual imagery, my hope is to reveal a certain complexity in Lil Wayne’s gestures of identity construct. It is not my goal to defend or justify Lil Wayne’s actions, but merely to complicate the reductive view of Southern hip hop as obtuse and destructive for the sake of enabling further scholarly conversation.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectLil Wayne
dc.subjectSouthern hip hop
dc.subjectrap
dc.subjectNew Orleans
dc.subjectDirty South
dc.subjectCash Money Records
dc.subjectbounce
dc.titleComplicating the complex
dc.title.alternativeLil Wayne and identity construct in southern hip hop
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentSchool of Music
dc.description.majorMusic
dc.description.advisorJean Kidula
dc.description.committeeJean Kidula
dc.description.committeeSusan Thomas
dc.description.committeeAdrian Childs


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record