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dc.contributor.authorBoring, Samuel Travis
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T21:01:00Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T21:01:00Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.otherboring_samuel_t_201305_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/boring_samuel_t_201305_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28673
dc.description.abstractGrowing food at home is a popular way for individuals to spend time outside and eat fresh produce. This study asks whether food gardens are connected with larger issues such as access to food and an environmental consciousness represented by ecological citizenship. Ecological Citizenship is a new theory in green political thought that focuses on practices. Through locating and mapping gardens in six census block groups as well as semi-structured interviews with gardeners in Athens, GA this study examines the presence and motivation for growing food at home. This study finds that growing food at home is motivated by concerns for the environment and desire for alternatives to the conventional food system. Growing food at home is significant and empowering for its many practitioners.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectecological citizenship
dc.subjectpractice theory
dc.subjectfood desert
dc.subjecturban agriculture
dc.subjectgardening
dc.titleGrowing ecological citizenship
dc.title.alternativemotivations and practices of home gardeners in Athens, GA
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentAnthropology
dc.description.majorAnthropology
dc.description.advisorJulie Velasquez Runk
dc.description.committeeJulie Velasquez Runk
dc.description.committeeTheodore L Gragson
dc.description.committeeJames Affolter


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