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dc.contributor.authorBarrow, Katherine Brown
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T21:00:48Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T21:00:48Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.otherbarrow_katherine_b_201305_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/barrow_katherine_b_201305_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28658
dc.description.abstractIn the literary movements of Regionalism and Realism that emerged in the wake of the Civil War, Albion Tourgée (1838-1905), Mark Twain (1835-1910), George Washington Cable (1844-1925), and Charles Chesnutt (1858-1932) contributed to the growing field of Southern fiction within these traditions. With varying degrees of verisimilitude, romance, and satire, all four of these authors placed issues of race and nationhood at the thematic center of their most influential novels. In many of their postbellum works of fiction, such as The Grandissimes, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Pudd’nhead Wilson and Those Extraordinary Twins, A Fool’s Errand, Bricks without Straw, Mandy Oxendine, The Conjure Woman, The House Behind the Cedars, and The Marrow of Tradition, they explored the persisting racial problems of American life in the last quarter of the nineteenth-century and developed themes that suggested that the nation was still mired in the problems of its past. Perhaps the most significant aspect their postwar novels share is the manner in which they present African American protagonists who actively pursue a better life for themselves by challenging the white patriarchal order. Through various methods of empowerment, such as verbal trickery, escaping slavery, passing into white life, educational and economic advancement, as well as the subversive acts of protest, violence, and revenge, these characters refuse to submit to the social hierarchy to which they are bound by either custom or law.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAlbion W. Tourgée
dc.subjectCharles W. Chesnutt
dc.subjectGeorge Washington Cable
dc.subjectMark Twain
dc.subjectRealism
dc.subjectRegionalism
dc.subjectLocal-Color
dc.subjectAfrican American Fiction
dc.subjectSouthern Fiction
dc.subjectPostbellum Fiction
dc.subjectAmerican Civil War
dc.subjectFederal Reconstruction
dc.subjectThe Grandissimes
dc.subjectAdventures of Huckleberry Finn
dc.subjectPudd’nhead Wilson and Those Extraordinary Twins
dc.subjectA Fool’s Errand
dc.subjectBricks without Stra
dc.subjectMandy Oxendine
dc.subjectThe Conjure Woman
dc.subjectThe House Behind the Cedars
dc.subjectThe Marrow of Tradition
dc.subjectThe Quarry
dc.subjectPaul Marchand, F. M. C.
dc.titleRace, region, and realism in the postbellum fiction of Albion Tourgée, Charles Chesnutt, George Washington Cable, And Mark Twain
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorJames Nagel
dc.description.committeeJames Nagel
dc.description.committeeHugh Ruppersburg
dc.description.committeeHubert McAlexander, Jr.


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