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dc.contributor.authorFloyd, Erinn Camille Fears
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:35:40Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:35:40Z
dc.date.issued2012-08
dc.identifier.otherfloyd_erinn_c_201208_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/floyd_erinn_c_201208_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28261
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine educators’ gifted referral efficacy and its relationship to referral of students for the gifted education program within a rural, predominately African American school district in the state of Alabama. More specifically, what is known about the identification of rural, African American students who are referred for gifted education programs, and if understanding of Frasier’s (1995c) Traits, Aptitudes, and Behaviors (TABs) constructs contributes to greater numbers of African American student referrals for gifted education programs in rural schools. Additionally, the relationship between educators’ gifted referral efficacy, gifted program referrals, and training in gifted education were explored. The population for the study consisted of educators who are employed in the Macon County Public School District during the 2011-2012 academic year. The data were collected from a sample of 114 teachers and analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation coefficients (two-tailed), and analysis of variance (ANOVA). The main findings from the study were: (1) the Gifted Referral Efficacy Scale (GRES), a piloted instrument, is a valid and reliable measurement of educators’ use of the TABs as a gifted identification instrument, (2) there was moderately statistically significant correlation between educators’ gifted referral efficacy and referrals using TABs, and (3) the training offered to educators did not significantly impact their referrals of rural, predominately African American gifted students. Based on the results of the study, it was concluded that the TABs are useful for assisting educators with looking at rural African, American gifted students through different lenses. Extensive professional development opportunities for all educators in the identification of this population of students is essential to increasing educators’ gifted referral efficacy and reversing the underrepresentation and underenrollment of rural, African American students in gifted education programs.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectgifted identification
dc.subjectdiversity
dc.subjectgifted education
dc.subjectteacher efficacy
dc.subjectTABs
dc.titleA descriptive study of educators' gifted referral efficacy using Frasier’s TABs in a predominately African American rural Alabama school district
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentEducational Psychology and Instructional Technology
dc.description.majorEducational Psychology
dc.description.advisorTarek C. Grantham
dc.description.committeeTarek C. Grantham
dc.description.committeeKecia Thomas
dc.description.committeeRosemary E. Phelps
dc.description.committeeThomas Hebert


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