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dc.contributor.authorWheeler, Wayne Arthur
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:34:33Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:34:33Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.otherwheeler_wayne_a_201205_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wheeler_wayne_a_201205_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28161
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigated the stability of race used as a predictor of recidivism on African American prisoners in South Carolina who received career and technical education while incarcerated. The purpose was to determine whether variables of security class, number of disciplinary reports, age at release, education level at intake, crime type, number of prior incarcerations, race, sex, and sentence length predicted recidivism for adults incarcerated in South Carolina who completed a career and technical education certificate program while in prison and those who did not completed a correctional education program. Data from all prisoners released between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2005 were included. The selected variables were used to create a model to predict recidivism in two samples: prisoners who had completed a career and technical education certificate while incarcerated and prisoners who had not completed an education certificate while incarcerated. This was done to both determine if these variables were statistically significant in predicting recidivism, as well as to determine if the same variables were significant in both populations. Stepwise logistic regression was conducted on both samples to determine the best model, age at release, number of prior incarcerations, education level at intake, security class and crime type were found to be significant predictors of recidivism for prisoners who completed a career and technical education certificate. Age at release, number of prior convictions, education level at intake, security class, crime type, race, sex and number of disciplinary reports were significant in the non-completer sample. Both models predicted recidivism more effectively than chance.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectPrisons
dc.subjectCorrectional Education
dc.subjectRecidivism
dc.subjectRegression
dc.subjectPrediction
dc.subjectCareer and Technical Education
dc.subjectCTE
dc.subjectWorkforce Education
dc.titleCareer and technical education’s impact on the predictor race for African American prisoners in South Carolina
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentWorkforce Education, Leadership, and Social Foundations
dc.description.majorWorkforce Education
dc.description.advisorJay Rojewski
dc.description.committeeJay Rojewski
dc.description.committeeMyra Womble
dc.description.committeeBettye Smith


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