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dc.contributor.authorRollin, Sharlonne Denise
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:33:42Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:33:42Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.otherrollin_sharlonne_d_201205_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rollin_sharlonne_d_201205_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28089
dc.description.abstractThis is the story of six teachers who share their life experiences and stories regarding their family social class backgrounds and histories. Grounded in the traditions of qualitative narrative research and expressed through active interviewing, this dissertation reflects the voices of the participants as well as the researcher. Using a theoretical framework based upon critical pedagogy, this work examines the idea that teachers conceptualize and discuss dominant discourses regarding class division and social class issues within the African American community and classrooms. It is the critical discussion of discourse which will allow teachers to make meaning of new connections between knowledge and power.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectSocial class
dc.subjectCritical pedagogy
dc.subjectAfrican American teachers
dc.subjectAfrican American students
dc.subjectDiscourse
dc.titleIn a class by themselves
dc.title.alternativepossibilities of class solidarity between middle class African American teachers and their economically disadvantaged students
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentElementary and Social Studies Education
dc.description.majorMiddle School Education
dc.description.advisorStephanie Jones
dc.description.committeeStephanie Jones
dc.description.committeeMark Vagle
dc.description.committeeJuanita Johnson-Bailey


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