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dc.contributor.authorLovelace, Frances Victoria
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:33:00Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:33:00Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.otherlovelace_frances_v_201205_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/lovelace_frances_v_201205_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28037
dc.description.abstractIn this study of James Joyce’s Ulysses (1922) I discuss the limits and dangers of using analogies between musical and literary works without firmly understanding the musical model that is being brought into comparison with the novel in question. Conversely, I show that a musical paradigm such as counterpoint, if properly defined, can be a very useful method by which to read and understand Joyce, since the syntax of music is as important to (and ever-present within) the world of Ulysses as that of the English language. I demonstrate that a contrapuntal reading of the often-overlooked “Wandering Rocks” episode serves to uncover some darkly ironic questions about Anglo-Irish politics, and that while the fugal structure that Joyce claimed for “Sirens” is a deeply suspect analogy, a reading of the musical notation within the episode leads to a new understanding of Leopold Bloom in relation to his wife, Molly.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectJames Joyce
dc.subjectMusic and Literature
dc.subjectCounterpoint
dc.title"Two notes in one there"
dc.title.alternativecounterpoint as paradigm in James Joyce's Ulysses
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorAdam Parkes
dc.description.committeeAdam Parkes
dc.description.committeeAidan Wasley
dc.description.committeeElizabeth Kraft


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