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dc.contributor.authorKabaci, Mary Jane
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:27:16Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:27:16Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.otherkabaci_mary_j_201205_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/kabaci_mary_j_201205_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/28001
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to gain consensus among researchers, college educators, and financial aid officers using the Delphi method on the personal finance knowledge, skills, and actions/behaviors - hereby known as core competencies - that are important for all undergraduate college students as well as undergraduate student education loan recipients and first-generation undergraduate college students. These specific sub-groups of college students may have differing needs for core personal finance concepts and competencies than other undergraduate college students. A panel of 36 experts who have knowledge of college students’ financial literacy and financial needs identified the personal finance concepts and competencies for student groups, using the Delphi method. A round of three questionnaires elicited responses from participants to identify personal finance core concepts and competencies that are most crucial for undergraduate college students. Several panel members also participated in personal in-depth interviews with the researcher to gain additional information and insight regarding survey responses, key findings, and recommendations for future research as well as financial education programs. Seven of 13 concepts and 140 competencies gained consensus as being important for undergraduate college students. Eight of 13 personal finance concepts and 139 competencies gained consensus by panel members as being essential for undergraduate student education loan recipients. All 14 personal finance concepts and 231 competencies gained consensus for first-generation undergraduate college students. The mean rankings by importance of each were identified. Mean rankings of those concepts and competencies which did not achieve consensus were also identified. Content analysis of the personal interviews identified several themes: (a) criteria used in ranking competencies; (b) experience of panel member; (c) timing of competencies; (d) concept and competency timeline; (e) personal finance curriculum and competencies; (f) identification of other student groups that may require specific personal finance concepts and competencies; (g) identification of others who would find value in this study; and (h) suggestions for future research regarding the personal finance concepts and personal finance competencies of undergraduate college students.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectDelphi method
dc.subjectfinancial education
dc.subjectfinancial literacy
dc.subjectpersonal finance
dc.subjectstudent education loans
dc.subjectstudent financial aid
dc.subjectfirst-generation college students
dc.subjectundergraduate college students
dc.titleComing to consensus
dc.title.alternativea Delphi study to identify the personal finance core concepts and competencies for undergraduate college students, undergraduate student education loan recipients, and first-generation undergraduate college students
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentHousing and Consumer Economics
dc.description.majorConsumer Economics
dc.description.advisorBrenda Cude
dc.description.committeeBrenda Cude
dc.description.committeeLance Palmer
dc.description.committeeJoan Koonce


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