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dc.contributor.authorWatts, Alison Page
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:25:29Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:25:29Z
dc.date.issued2011-12
dc.identifier.otherwatts_alison_p_201112_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/watts_alison_p_201112_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27844
dc.description.abstractAn effigy, according to performance studies theorist John Roach, is an uncanny object that “summons the dead to enable the living to get a bearing on what they are becoming” (Roach 83). For writers, theorists and activists working to negotiate traumatic silences within the historical narratives that shape the Black Atlantic experience, effigies have the peculiar, uncanny potential to both stabilize and problematize formations of subjectivity and community. This ambivalent potential stems from the fact that the dead summoned by these effigies bear biographies that are partial, ambiguous, or even contradictory. By examining short fiction by Chimimanda Ngozi Adichie (“Imitation”), Edwidge Danticat (“Nineteen Thirty-Seven”) and Veronica Henry (“My Soul to Free”), this paper will explore the symbolic and semantic role effigies play in relation to characters’ work of negotiating their identities and their position within social, cultural and historical frameworks.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectFiction
dc.subjectBlack Atlantic
dc.subjectMaterial Culture
dc.subjectThing Theory
dc.subjectEffigy
dc.titleVolatile things
dc.title.alternativehaunted object biographies and transnational identity formation in the Black Atlantic
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorBarbara McCaskill
dc.description.committeeBarbara McCaskill
dc.description.committeeR. Baxter Miller
dc.description.committeeMichelle Ballif


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