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dc.contributor.authorScott, Carson Darrell
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:25:07Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:25:07Z
dc.date.issued2011-12
dc.identifier.otherscott_carson_d_201112_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/scott_carson_d_201112_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27810
dc.description.abstractIn response to the growing concerns of funeral de-ritualization, this study utilizes a descriptive phenomenological approach in an attempt to understand the funeral experiences of a sample of black and white older and middle-aged adults, with a particular emphasis on under what conditions these rituals fail to produce the various positive outcomes established by the interaction ritual theory model, and to speculate as to why these breakdowns may have occurred. Breakdowns were found among the conditions of bodily co-presence, barriers to outsiders, mutual focus, and shared mood. These findings suggest that much of the tension surrounding funerals may be tied to cultural and structural shifts that have occurred over the past century in the funeral industry as well as in the way Americans perceive and handle death.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectFunerals, Rituals, Older Adults, Baby-Boomers, Death
dc.titleWhen funerals fail
dc.title.alternativefunerals through the lens of interaction ritual theory
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentSociology
dc.description.majorSociology
dc.description.advisorJames Dowd
dc.description.committeeJames Dowd
dc.description.committeeAnne P. Glass
dc.description.committeeWilliam Finlay


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