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dc.contributor.authorParmer, John
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:24:48Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:24:48Z
dc.date.issued2011-12
dc.identifier.otherparmer_john_201112_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/parmer_john_201112_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27782
dc.description.abstractThis study examines how the public’s trust and confidence in the Department of Homeland Security to manage a smallpox outbreak influences their willingness to cooperate with government recommendations. A bioterrorist event in the U.S. presents an extraordinary requirement for risk communication planning, preparation and practice. A deeper understanding of how trust and confidence lead to cooperation will be useful in guiding the government’s communication to the public during a bioterrorism event and will offer practical guidance to risk communicators and public health professionals on how to maximize cooperation with government recommendations during a smallpox outbreak.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectbioterrorism
dc.subjecttrust
dc.subjectrisk communication
dc.titleSmallpox vaccine recommendations
dc.title.alternativeis trust a shot in the arm?
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentHealth Promotion and Behavior
dc.description.majorHealth Promotion and Behavior
dc.description.advisorMarsha Davis
dc.description.committeeMarsha Davis
dc.description.committeeMark Wilson
dc.description.committeeVicki Freimuth
dc.description.committeeKevin Dobbins


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