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dc.contributor.authorLamanna, Lawrence Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:24:28Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:24:28Z
dc.date.issued2011-12
dc.identifier.otherlamanna_lawrence_j_201112_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/lamanna_lawrence_j_201112_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27751
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation proposes new theoretical explanations for observed differences in the policymaker–intelligence-provider relationship in the United States and the United Kingdom. Despite historically close integration between the two intelligence systems, scholars of intelligence studies have observed that this relationship is much closer in the United Kingdom than in the United States. Up until now, the only explanation offered has been based mainly on perceived cultural differences. This dissertation suggests that less secrecy, less centralization of the political system, and larger government and intelligence organizations lead to greater incentives to politicize intelligence and therefore result in more distance between policymakers and intelligence providers in order to reduce the opportunity to politicize.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectIntelligence
dc.subjectUnited Kingdom
dc.subjectUnited States
dc.subjectPolicymaker
dc.subjectPoliticization
dc.subjectAssessment
dc.subjectAnalysis
dc.subjectEstimate
dc.subjectTheory
dc.titleTheoretical reasons for variations in the intelligence-policymaking distance in the United States and the United Kingdom
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentInternational Affairs
dc.description.majorInternational Affairs
dc.description.advisorLoch Johnson
dc.description.committeeLoch Johnson
dc.description.committeeBrock Tessman
dc.description.committeeHal G. Rainey
dc.description.committeeGary Bertsch


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