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dc.contributor.authorSpriggs, Amy Day
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:22:44Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:22:44Z
dc.date.issued2011-08
dc.identifier.otherspriggs_amy_d_201108_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/spriggs_amy_d_201108_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27604
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to evaluate both video modeling and observational learning to teach age-appropriate recreation and leisure skills to students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Results were evaluated via a multiple probe design across participants for video modeling and across participants and behaviors for observational learning. Participants included 4 children with autism, ages 8 to 11, who were served in self-contained special education classrooms. Results indicated video modeling was effective for teaching chained tasks, across students; observational learning occurred for at least some steps across students. Results and future implications are discussed.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAutism
dc.subjectVideo modeling
dc.subjectObservational learning
dc.subjectRecreation and leisure skills
dc.titleVideo modeling and observational learning to teach recreation and leisure skills to students with autism
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentCommunication Sciences and Special Education
dc.description.majorSpecial Education
dc.description.advisorDavid Gast
dc.description.committeeDavid Gast
dc.description.committeeJohn Langone
dc.description.committeeJonathan Campbell
dc.description.committeeKevin Ayres


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