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dc.contributor.authorHarris, Winfred Glynne
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:02:42Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:02:42Z
dc.date.issued2011-08
dc.identifier.otherharris_winfred_g_201108_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/harris_winfred_g_201108_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27470
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation focuses on the “acting White” phenomenon (e.g., Carter, 2006; Ford, Grantham, & Whiting, 2008b; Fordham & Ogbu, 1986), as it pertains to Black college students. Through an interview study, I gathered questionnaire based data relevant to this issue for 40 university students. From these 40 questionnaires, I chose twelve interview participants. In one hour interviews and follow up correspondence, I gathered the perspectives of these eight students on the topic of “acting White” (Ford et al., 2008b; Fordham & Ogbu, 1986). Using data derived from these focused interviews and questionnaires, I have explored the findings and relate them to the current literature relevant to gifted Black students and the “acting White” phenomenon.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectActing White, African American, Gifted Students, Bullying,
dc.titleThe influence of the “acting white” phenomenon in the achievement experiences of academically successful African American college students
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentEducational Psychology and Instructional Technology
dc.description.majorEducational Psychology
dc.description.advisorTarek Grantham
dc.description.committeeTarek Grantham
dc.description.committeeKecia Thomas
dc.description.committeeJuanita Johnson-Bailey
dc.description.committeeThomas Hebert


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