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dc.contributor.authorCavender, George Armstrong
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:02:03Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:02:03Z
dc.date.issued2011-08
dc.identifier.othercavender_george_a_201108_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/cavender_george_a_201108_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27414
dc.description.abstractWhile the effects of high pressure on the safety and quality of food have been studied occasionally for over one hundred years, it is only recently that the widespread study and use of the technology has become feasible. One of the more interesting and least studied type of high pressure processing is continuous high pressure processing (CHPP), sometimes referred to as "high pressure homogenization" or "dynamic Pascalization." The current work examines the history and work in the field to date and goes on to investigate the effects of various CHPP systems on the microbial, physical, structural and sensory properties of liquid foods. Because the high shear conditions created in the release component(s) of a CHPP system generate significant heat, it has often been difficult to separate the anti-microbial effects of pressure and shear from those of temperature, particularly with regard to vegetative cells. By using a modified valve with inline cooling, the instantaneous temperature rise was dramatically lessened, showing that only a modest amount of inactivation results from the increased pressure and shear. The work further explains the effects of microfluidization, a type of CHPP system based upon a fixed geometry pressure release component, on ice cream mixes and the ice creams made from those mixes. Microfluidization is shown to effect changes in the texture, melting properties and viscosity of finished ice cream and to thereby improve the sensory characteristics of the same. It is later shown that the changes are evoked on a microstructural level, with visible differences apparent in electron micrographs, and that these changes affect the particle size distribution, apparent viscosity and dynamic rheology with treated samples showing more uniform particle size, significantly higher viscosity and more solid-like behavior than untreated samples.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectHigh Pressure Processing
dc.subjectMicrofluidization
dc.subjectInactivation
dc.subjectSensory
dc.subjectRheology
dc.subjectViscosity
dc.subjectMicrostructure
dc.titleContinuous high pressure processing of liquid foods
dc.title.alternativean analysis of physical, structural and microbial effects
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentFood Science and Technology
dc.description.majorFood Science
dc.description.advisorWilliam L. Kerr
dc.description.committeeWilliam L. Kerr
dc.description.committeeRobert Shewfelt
dc.description.committeeJoseph F. Frank
dc.description.committeeMark Eiteman


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