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dc.contributor.authorButler, William
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:02:00Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:02:00Z
dc.date.issued2011-08
dc.identifier.otherbutler_william_201108_mhp
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/butler_william_201108_mhp
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27408
dc.description.abstractMixed use is a popular form of development today and will become even more so with the demographic shift currently underway with generation Y and baby boomers. However, mixed use faces the problem of difficulty attaining financing and to be successful often has to rely on public-private partnerships. To solve this problem mixed use in historic structures is a viable option for developers. This thesis examines mixed use in historic structures in Durham, North Carolina via case studies. The studies show that mixed use in historic structures solves these problems associated with mixed use through the application of historic tax credits and local government incentives.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectMixed use
dc.subjectHistoric structures
dc.subjectTax credits
dc.subjectPublic-private partnerships
dc.subjectDurham, North Carolina
dc.titleMixed use in historic structures
dc.title.alternativea path to the future, a link to the past
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMHP
dc.description.departmentSchool of Environmental Design
dc.description.majorHistoric Preservation
dc.description.advisorJames Reap
dc.description.committeeJames Reap
dc.description.committeeUmit Yilmaz
dc.description.committeeJohn C. Waters
dc.description.committeeEvan Cramer


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