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dc.contributor.authorWood, Lauren Ashley
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:01:25Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:01:25Z
dc.date.issued2011-05
dc.identifier.otherwood_lauren_a_201105_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/wood_lauren_a_201105_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27355
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, the “changing nature of work” has become a growing topic of interest, but little empirical research has actually investigated proposed changes in the way modern organizations do business. This study uses cross-temporal meta-analysis of means to examine changes in five core job characteristics over the past 35 years. Results revealed that jobs are increasingly characterized by task identity, task significance, skill variety, and autonomy since 1975. However, feedback failed to show significant gains. Moderator analyses did not support sample gender as a moderator of changes in core job characteristics, indicating that jobs have not become more enriched for women in recent years. These findings are discussed in light of theoretical and practical implications for organizations navigating the changing nature of work.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectJob Characteristics
dc.subjectTask Identity
dc.subjectTask Significance
dc.subjectSkill Variety
dc.subjectAutonomy
dc.subjectFeedback
dc.subjectWork Design
dc.subjectChanging Nature of Work
dc.titleThe changing nature of jobs
dc.title.alternativea meta-analysis examining changes in job characterisitcs over time
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorBrian Hoffman
dc.description.committeeBrian Hoffman
dc.description.committeeLillian Eby
dc.description.committeeW. Keith Campbell


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