Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWaters, Bryan Jesse
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:01:15Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:01:15Z
dc.date.issued2011-05
dc.identifier.otherwaters_bryan_j_201105_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/waters_bryan_j_201105_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27339
dc.description.abstractThis thesis argues that Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities is a novel particularly interested in sound as a way of understanding human behavior and history. Working from the assumption that Dickens is primarily a visually oriented novelist, this thesis suggests A Tale of Two Cities is an anomaly in the Dickens canon. Building on the insights of cultural critics such as Marshall McLuhan and Walter Ong, this thesis concludes that sonic metaphors provided Dickens with an effective medium to convey the disorder unleashed by the French Revolution.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectCharles Dickens
dc.subjectMarshall McLuhan
dc.subjectWalter Ong
dc.subjectMichel Foucault
dc.subjectA Tale of Two Cities
dc.subjectSound
dc.subjectEchoes
dc.subjectOrality
dc.subjectLiteracy
dc.titleA wonderful corner for echoes
dc.title.alternativethe use of sound in Charles Dickens' A tale of two cities
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorRichard Menke
dc.description.committeeRichard Menke
dc.description.committeeAdam Parkes
dc.description.committeeWilliam Kretzschmar


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record