Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVerbist, Gilbert Calen
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:01:10Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:01:10Z
dc.date.issued2011-05
dc.identifier.otherverbist_gilbert_c_201105_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/verbist_gilbert_c_201105_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27331
dc.description.abstractThis thesis investigates the role of Walker Percy’s theories on language, derived from the writings of Charles Sanders Peirce, in The Thanatos Syndrome. The argument of this thesis is that the language use of individuals affected by heavy sodium poisoning can best be explained in the terms of Percy’s language theories, even though those theories are not elaborated within the novel itself but in various non-fiction works by the author. One of the central tenets of Percy’s theory on language is that human language is triadic whereas all other forms of communication (and, in fact, all other phenomena) are dyadic. Percy saw the tendency treat as dyadic the triadic behavior of language to be reductionist and dangerous, which is the commentary inherent in the language use of sodium-affected individuals in The Thanatos Syndrome.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectThe Thanatos Syndrome
dc.subjectCharles Sanders Peirce
dc.subjectlanguage use
dc.subjecttriadic
dc.subjectdyadic
dc.subjectsemiotics
dc.subjectLost in the Cosmos
dc.titleLost in the bayou
dc.title.alternativelanguage theory and the Thanatos Syndrome
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorHugh Ruppersburg
dc.description.committeeHugh Ruppersburg
dc.description.committeeHubert McAlexander, Jr.
dc.description.committeeWilliam Kretzschmar


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record