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dc.contributor.authorSanders, Virginia
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:00:42Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:00:42Z
dc.date.issued2011-05
dc.identifier.othersanders_virginia_201105_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/sanders_virginia_201105_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27290
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the role that international organizations can play in the crisis resolution process. Specifically, I examine the ability of states to influence both the domestic population and domestic leaders in favor of crisis resolution, with regime type as an intervening variable in the process. I examine my hypotheses empirically, utilizing the International Crisis Behavior Dataset. The results of my analysis are mixed with international organizations seen as largely ineffective in the crisis resolution process. However, the evidence does support my hypothesis that international organizations may be effective in changing public opinion in favor of crisis resolution.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectInternational Organizations
dc.subjectRegional Organizations
dc.subjectConflict Resolution
dc.subjectRegime Type
dc.subjectPublic Opinion
dc.titleInternational organizations and crisis resolution
dc.title.alternativea domestic perspective
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentInternational Affairs
dc.description.majorInternational Affairs
dc.description.advisorPatricia Sullivan
dc.description.committeePatricia Sullivan
dc.description.committeeMaurits Van deR Veen
dc.description.committeeHan Park


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