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dc.contributor.authorMorris, Sara Zane
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T20:00:10Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T20:00:10Z
dc.date.issued2011-05
dc.identifier.othermorris_sara_z_201105_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/morris_sara_z_201105_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27242
dc.description.abstractThe current study focuses on trajectories of offending among African Americans from childhood through late adolescence. Using life-course theory as a guide, there are two main goals. The first is to describe the number and type of trajectories of delinquency separately for males and females, as much research in the past on trajectories has focused on white and/or male samples. The second goal is to investigate both early childhood characteristics and cumulative disadvantages, both in the form of potential “turning points” such as experiencing a family transition and victimization and cumulative experiences of stressors such as racial discrimination, and their effects on pathways of delinquent behaviors. Results indicated that there were four distinct groups of offenders among both males and females, but there were important differences between the two gender samples in patterns of offending. Males displayed higher levels of delinquency at each time point, and the pattern over time for one trajectory group in particular was different for the male vs. female sample. In addition, a number of factors were important in predicting patterns of delinquency over time. For both genders, delinquent friends and racial discrimination positively predicted delinquency. For males these effects were slightly stronger. Within the female sample, levels of authoritative parenting and excelling in school also significantly predicted trajectory group membership. The results represent a contribution to developmental research in criminology, and directions for future research stemming from this project are also discussed.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectlife-course theory
dc.subjectdelinquency
dc.subjectgroup-based trajectory model
dc.titleTrajectories of offending among African American adolescents
dc.title.alternativethe role of cumulative disadvantages
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentSociology
dc.description.majorSociology
dc.description.advisorRonald Simons
dc.description.committeeRonald Simons
dc.description.committeeLeslie Simons
dc.description.committeeThomas McNulty
dc.description.committeeJody Clay-Warner


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