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dc.contributor.authorHagood, Thomas Chase
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T19:59:08Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T19:59:08Z
dc.date.issued2011-05
dc.identifier.otherhagood_thomas-chase_201105_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hagood_thomas-chase_201105_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/27147
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores the dynamics of white settlement at Tuscaloosa, Alabama and the role of settlers’ written words in mythologizing the nineteenth-century, American frontier. The lived experiences of settlers, captured in individuals’ letters, diaries, deeds, wills, poems and books, tell how they transformed a frontier into the Old South. Over the course of the nineteenth century, however, generations of migrants, storytellers and local writers also blended historical accounts, memories, Native legends and fiction, thereby contributing to the creation of the myths of the American frontier and the early formations of southern identity.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectwhite settlement
dc.subjectTuscaloosa
dc.subjectTuscaloosa, Alabama
dc.subjectAmerican frontier
dc.subjectOld South
dc.subjectOld Southwest
dc.subjectsouthern identity
dc.titleRewriting the frontier
dc.title.alternativemaking history in Tuscaloosa, Alabama
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.description.majorHistory
dc.description.advisorAllan Kulikoff
dc.description.committeeAllan Kulikoff
dc.description.committeeClaudio Saunt
dc.description.committeeStephen Mihm
dc.description.committeeMichael Kwass
dc.description.committeeKathleen Clark


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