Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorParrott, Jill Marie
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T19:00:00Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T19:00:00Z
dc.date.issued2010-12
dc.identifier.otherparrott_jill_m_201012_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/parrott_jill_m_201012_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26981
dc.description.abstractAuthor-God Help Us!: Some Rights Reserved Copyright in Theory and in Practice argues that some rights reserved copyright, through which individual creators may choose flexible copyright terms, is uniquely situated in our time and provides an avenue to widen discussions about the role of the author and the protection of intellectual property by neutralizing the all rights reserved/no rights reserved binary currently at war in the copyright system. Copyright licensure has become more strict as entities have striven to hold tightly to their intellectual property, often to the detriment of creative progress and for the purpose of maintaining profit control. In fact, as language theories have argued for the inherent separation of text and author, copyright laws have inversely argued for tighter control between text and author. On the other hand, a movement to reduce or to abolish copyright law altogether has arisen that seeks to sever all connections between creator and creation in favor of a free-for-all that keeps authors from legal right to work that is their intellectual property. These differing ideologies set up a false binary in which either a creator of the text must keep control over the uses of his work in order to keep it free from outside pillaging or a creator must open herself up to a world where authors are not given credit for their work. As we have seen in the cases of many other binary oppositions, neither of these extremes accurately express the wide array of possibilities that could exist between “all rights reserved” copyright and “no rights reserved” copyright. Particularly, rhetoric and composition theorists should insert themselves into this conversation because its ramifications may very well affect how we are allowed to conduct our classrooms and to publish our research in the future. This movement represents a marked enough shift in language studies to warrant deep and broad intellectual inquiry. My discussion contributes to the growing interest in the borderlands ideological space of some rights reserved and spurs others to include it as part of their intellectual agenda.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectauthorship, copyright, intellectual property, plagiarism, composition
dc.titleAuthor-god help us!
dc.title.alternativesome rights reserved copyright in theory and in practice
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorMichelle Ballif
dc.description.committeeMichelle Ballif
dc.description.committeeSusan Rosenbaum
dc.description.committeeBarbara McCaskill


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record