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dc.contributor.authorKozinsky, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:56:28Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:56:28Z
dc.date.issued2010-08
dc.identifier.otherkozinsky_elizabeth_201008_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/kozinsky_elizabeth_201008_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26680
dc.description.abstractAt first othered by his text and then given the power to marginalize the next generation, Heathcliff provides a vision of what a Caliban who succeeds would be and further explores the idea of a family producing its own outsider. Highlighting the cyclical nature of both texts, Kozinsky analyzes Heathcliff and Caliban’s shared kinship with the Medieval Wild Man to explain the varying reactions to them. She also considers Heathcliff’s affinity to the mastermind Prospero and their relationship to the tradition of revenge tragedy. By considering both the structural similarities of Shakespeare's play against Brontë's novel and the varying interpretations of both for a nineteenth century audience, a better sense of these characters emerges, why we fear and are fascinated by them.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectHeathcliff
dc.subjectCaliban
dc.subjectWild Man
dc.subjectrevenge
dc.subjectOther
dc.subjectEmily Brontë
dc.subjectShakespeare
dc.subjectalterity
dc.subjectWuthering Heights
dc.subjectTempest
dc.subjectProspero
dc.subjectByron
dc.subjectnatural man
dc.subjectappropriation
dc.titleKings of their castles
dc.title.alternativereading Heathcliff as a Caliban who succeeds
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorChristy Desmet
dc.description.committeeChristy Desmet


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