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dc.contributor.authorJuwayeyi, Murendehle Mulheva
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:56:20Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:56:20Z
dc.date.issued2010-08
dc.identifier.otherjuwayeyi_murendehle_m_201008_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/juwayeyi_murendehle_m_201008_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26668
dc.description.abstractThis study examines why the U.S. government established the BBG firewall over civilian international broadcasters and shifted its policy from exercising editorial control over the broadcasters to granting them professional independence after the end of the Cold War. As part of the examination, the study shows how the BBG firewall is unique in comparison with previous entities that governed the broadcasters during the Cold War -- the USIA, the BIB, and the Board for Radio Broadcasting to Cuba. The study also shows how the BBG firewall is unique even in comparison with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) that governs public broadcasters and acts as a firewall for them. Legally, the study considers whether the government was obligated to give the broadcasters professional independence by establishing the BBG firewall. In the final analysis, the study discusses how lawmakers wanted the firewall to function to protect the professional independence of the broadcasters and to ensure their credibility. The study also considers why lawmakers and policymakers thought such credibility would benefit the United States. As such, the study develops four major concepts -- editorial control, firewall, professional independence, and credibility -- as they apply specifically to civilian international broadcasters.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectAlhurra, Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG), Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), Congress, Civilian International Broadcasting, Doctrine of Government Speech, Editorial Independence, Firewall, First Amendment, Government-Funded Nonmilitary Inter
dc.titleThe establishment of the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG) as a firewall for United States government-funded nonmilitary international broadcasters
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentGrady College of Journalism and Mass Communication
dc.description.majorMass Communication
dc.description.advisorWilliam Lee
dc.description.committeeWilliam Lee
dc.description.committeeLeara Rhodes
dc.description.committeeHan Park
dc.description.committeeLouise Benjamin
dc.description.committeeAlison Alexander


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