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dc.contributor.authorUsselman, Laura
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:30:06Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:30:06Z
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.otherusselman_laura_201005_ab
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/usselman_laura_201005_ab
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26522
dc.description.abstractThe study of literature is often obsessed with the examination of voice in fiction; the free indirect discourse of Jane Austen, chorus of stream of consciousness narratives of William Faulkner, unreliable narration of Wilkie Collins, and first-person dialect of Mark Twain all gain their interest from the question of who is speaking, and how they are doing it. The work of developing one’s own voice, through some combination of originality, mimicry, and practice, is one of the most important tasks any inexperienced writer can, either consciously or unwittingly, take on. The two stories in this volume are an exploration of multivocality, the way in which the voices of author and characters blend, work together, and manage to stay distinct within a work of fiction. By working in both the third and first person, the two pieces paint a composite portrait of the difficulties and rewards of finding or forming an authorial voice in the short story.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectMultivocality
dc.subjectYoung Writers
dc.subjectNarration in the Short Story
dc.titleThe shifting space between the trees / Espresso Lane
dc.typeHonors
dc.description.degreeAB
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorReginald McKnight
dc.description.committeeReginald McKnight
dc.description.committeeJudith Ortiz Cofer


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