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dc.contributor.authorSorensen, Kelly Lynn
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:29:48Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:29:48Z
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.othersorensen_kelly_l_201005_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/sorensen_kelly_l_201005_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26496
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the relationship between employees’ group-level perceptions of safety climate and organizational justice and rates of occupational injuries and workers’ compensation claiming. Society and organizations alike stand to gain considerably from the prevention and management of workplace disabilities. Because organizations may have at least partial control over factors which affect both rates of injury on the job and the decision to file a workers’ compensation claim, a better understanding of the antecedents of accidents and workers’ compensation claiming can potentially lead to a reduction in both. This paper examines the relationships between perceived safety climate, organizational justice, accident rates and workers’ compensation claiming. Findings suggest that employees’ perceptions of safety climate and organizational justice vary depending upon subgroup. Partial support was found for a negative relationship between safety climate and injury rates and claiming. Support was not found for the hypothesized negative relationship between justice perceptions and claiming. The hypothesized relationship between injury rates and days lost time claiming was also not supported,. Finally, results for tests of reverse causality were equivocal, with cross lagged panel analyses showing some support for a reciprocal relationship between safety climate and injuries and claiming, but with latent growth modeling (LGM) analyses showing no significant relationships between these variables.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectSafety Climate
dc.subjectOrganizational Justice
dc.subjectWorkers’ Compensation
dc.titleSafety climate and organizational justice as predictors of occupational injury rates and the decision to file for workers’ compensation benefits
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorChuck Lance
dc.description.committeeChuck Lance
dc.description.committeeKecia Thomas
dc.description.committeeBrian Hoffman


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