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dc.contributor.authorSanders, Matthew Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:29:33Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:29:33Z
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.othersanders_matthew_a_201005_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/sanders_matthew_a_201005_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26472
dc.description.abstractPrevious research in Terror Management Theory has shown that when mortality is made salient, participants are more likely to favor stereotype consistent individuals relative to stereotype inconsistent individuals (Schimel, et al., 1999). This study sought to expand upon these prior findings by examining the extent to which a person fit a certain stereotype would relate to their subsequent liking scores of that individual. Participants first rated several occupations, then either had their mortality or experience watching television made salient, and finally they made judgments about stereotype fit and liking for another person. Results from the study were unclear, though a different research design might elucidate the effects further.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectterror management theory
dc.subjectstereotypes
dc.subjectmortality salience
dc.subjectstereotype judgments
dc.titleEffects of mortality salience on stereotype usage in judgments
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorLenny L. Martin
dc.description.committeeLenny L. Martin
dc.description.committeeVictoria Plaut
dc.description.committeeW. Keith Campbell


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