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dc.contributor.authorRycyk, Matthew Thomas
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:29:32Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:29:32Z
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.otherrycyk_matthew_t_201005_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/rycyk_matthew_t_201005_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26470
dc.description.abstractThe Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 provides for a much different set of regulations than those that cover pharmaceuticals and conventional food products. Under this law, the dietary supplement manufacturers are responsible for ensuring that the supplement is safe before it is marketed. However, no efficacy claims can be made because clinical trials are not required. Manufacturers do not register their products and do not have to receive approval before marketing. It is the responsibility of the FDA to monitor safety in the post-market environment. In the years since the passing of the DSHEA, there have been instances where supplements have not been safe for use. Through a critical change analysis of the issues and gathered expert opinions this research addresses two questions: Are dietary supplements safe for use or is there need for reformed DSHEA legislation to ensure safety?
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectDSHEA
dc.subjectFDA
dc.subjectHerbal Supplement
dc.subjectcGMP
dc.subjectDietary Supplement
dc.titleDietary supplements and the DSHEA of 1994
dc.title.alternativeis reform needed to ensure safety?
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentBioPharma Regulatory Affairs
dc.description.majorPharmacy
dc.description.advisorGary Dykstra
dc.description.committeeGary Dykstra
dc.description.committeeRandall Tackett
dc.description.committeePaul Brooks


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