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dc.contributor.authorPitts, Brian
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:29:18Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:29:18Z
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.otherpitts_brian_201005_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/pitts_brian_201005_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26451
dc.description.abstractWebsites are an increasingly important part of how people seek out political information. Many political scientists believe that the web provides diverse new sources of information. However, some research suggests that the structure of the web promotes a winners-take-all pattern wherein a few sites on any topic receive the bulk of the attention. By building software to analyze the links between webpages on a topic, I am able to demonstrate the latter pattern on four political issues. When analyzing the top sites on each issue, I find that traditional sources of information are outnumbered by web-only sources with formats that allow user participation.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectsearch engine, hyperlink, internet, political communications
dc.titleEvaluating googlearchy
dc.title.alternativeassessing the diversity of political websites
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentPolitical Science
dc.description.majorPolitical Science
dc.description.advisorAudrey Haynes
dc.description.committeeAudrey Haynes
dc.description.committeeKeith Dougherty
dc.description.committeeRyan Bakker


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