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dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Laura Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:28:53Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:28:53Z
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.othermcdonald_laura_e_201005_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/mcdonald_laura_e_201005_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26414
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France, Charlotte Smith’s Desmond, and William Godwin’s Caleb Williams as works of political activism. I approach these texts within the context of a newly developed sociability that combines the coffeehouse of the mid-eighteenth century with the new developments in publishing and the circulation of texts. In a time of constant political change, these texts engage with a new audience of men and women who are becoming more actively involved in agitating for political reforms. Because of these new audiences, Burke, Smith, and Godwin modify their methods of persuasion and didacticism to educate and convince their readership of their own political stance. The works discussed combine the political with the literary to convince new audiences of political arguments.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectEdmund Burke
dc.subjectReflections on the Revolution in France
dc.subjectCharlotte Smith
dc.subjectDesmond
dc.subjectWilliam Godwin
dc.subjectCaleb Williams
dc.subjectRomantic sociability
dc.subjectFrench Revolution
dc.subjectJüergen Habermas
dc.titleSociability as political activism
dc.title.alternativewriting for change in the 1790s
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorRoxanne Eberle
dc.description.committeeRoxanne Eberle
dc.description.committeeElizabeth Kraft


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