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dc.contributor.authorFerguson, Stephanie
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:27:41Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:27:41Z
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.otherferguson_stephanie_201005_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/ferguson_stephanie_201005_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26315
dc.description.abstractAs a result of the anxiety induced in the British mind by the terrors of the French Revolution, playwright Joanna Baillie deals with the Revolutionary theatricality by creating a theatrical observation machine. Using specifically physically and visually based, interpretive dramaturgy, Baillie encourages audiences to focus on minute details in order to analyze the psychology of her characters, and then encourages them to turn that gaze toward each other, creating a method of surveillance to combat anxiety, which, in turn, produces anxiety. In contrast, Charles Dickens, in dealing with the subject of the French Revolution in A Tale of Two Cities, shows the damaging results of unsympathetic curiosity, the dehumanization and paranoia of surveillance, and through the direction of gazes throughout the novel, emphasizes the importance of the privacy of the individual.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectFrench Revolution
dc.subjectEighteenth-century Theater
dc.subjectSurveillance
dc.subjectParanoia, Anxiety
dc.subjectStage Direction
dc.subjectGaze
dc.titleBaillie, Dickens, and the theater of surveillance
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.description.majorEnglish
dc.description.advisorRichard Menke
dc.description.committeeRichard Menke
dc.description.committeeRoxanne Eberle
dc.description.committeeChristy Desmet


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