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dc.contributor.authorBright, Melissa A.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:26:56Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:26:56Z
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.otherbright_melissa_a_201005_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/bright_melissa_a_201005_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26251
dc.description.abstractAlthough numerous researchers have found that young children have difficulty perceiving both a concrete and an abstract dimension of a symbol (i.e., achieving dual representation), few researchers have examined the reasoning behind this difficulty. In this study we explore individual differences in cognitive flexibility as they relate to achieving dual representation. Participants (children at 2.5, 3.0 and 3.5 years) completed a standard scale model task (to assess dual representation) and a Dimensional Change Card Sort (DCCS) task (to assess cognitive flexibility). It was expected that children with good cognitive flexibility (i.e., switchers) would perform better on a task of dual representation than would children with poor cognitive flexibility (i.e., perseverators). Although our predictions were not supported, findings from our data warrant future investigations on this topic. Limitations and future directions are discussed.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectCognitive Flexibility
dc.subjectChild Development
dc.subjectDual Representation
dc.titlePerseverators are “stuck” on a concrete dimension
dc.title.alternativeindividual differences in achieving dual representation
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorJanet Frick
dc.description.committeeJanet Frick
dc.description.committeeAnne Shaffer
dc.description.committeePatricia Miller


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