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dc.contributor.authorBlickenstaff, Keri
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:26:43Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:26:43Z
dc.date.issued2010-05
dc.identifier.otherblickenstaff_keri_201005_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/blickenstaff_keri_201005_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26240
dc.description.abstractShostakovich’s Symphony No. 7 (“Leningrad”) has a unique history in its topicality and reception. It received rave reviews in the Soviet Union, but once the score reached Western shores, music critics were skeptical from the outset. Their discussions concerned a wide variety of aesthetic, social, and political implications, but comment on the music was negligible. Not only was there a lack of depth to their musical arguments, but also a disregard of movements Two, Three, and Four. My thesis will provide a survey of the symphony’s reception outside of the Soviet Union, with antithetical Russian opinions included intermittently as a point of contrast. A detailed examination of the issues espoused by critics in America as well as the absence of musical considerations in their discourse provides a framework for my own investigation into the music of Shostakovich’s Seventh Symphony, wherein a deeper insight into its construction and the processes of opposition and distortion will be provided.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectShostakovich
dc.subjectSeventh Symphony
dc.subjectreception
dc.subjectopposition
dc.subjectdistortion
dc.titleRe-examining the warhorse
dc.title.alternativeShostakovich's Leningrad symphony
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentSchool of Music
dc.description.majorMusic
dc.description.advisorDavid Haas
dc.description.committeeDavid Haas
dc.description.committeeStephen Valdez
dc.description.committeeAdrian Childs


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