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dc.contributor.authorMcQuinn, Ilana Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:24:59Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:24:59Z
dc.date.issued2009-12
dc.identifier.othermcquinn_ilana_r_200912_ab
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/mcquinn_ilana_r_200912_ab
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26105
dc.description.abstractCzechoslovakia in the 20th Century followed a tumultuous path that led it to freedom from the three-hundred year yoke of the Habsburg Empire, an existence as a small democratic nation surrounded by dictatorship, Nazi occupation twenty short years later, and finally the total and complete de-individualization under Soviet Communism. Pushed to independence by the frustration with a protracted existence as the “other” in the German dominated Habsburg Empire, Czechs continued to struggle with developing an identity independent of the crutch of the “other.” Some have argued that the muted method of resistance that the Czechs employed through the majority of the Nazi and Communist control of Czechoslovakia weakened the Czech claim to a unified identity as a people. The ironic comedies of Jaroslav Hašek and Bohumil Hrabal, however, exemplify how crucial intellectual and literary figures became for solidifying the Czech national identity. This paper examines the manner in which Czech culture and national identity developed in the 20th Century with special attention to The Good Soldier Švejk, Closely Watched Trains, and Too Loud a Solitude from the repressive periods of World War I, World War II, and Communist control.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectCzechoslovakia
dc.subjectCzech
dc.subjectNationalism
dc.subjectWorld War I
dc.subjectHabsburg Empire
dc.subjectWorld War II
dc.subjectMunich Conference
dc.subjectNormalization
dc.subjectPrague Spring
dc.subjectThe Good Soldier Švejk, Closely Watched Trains
dc.subjectToo Loud a Solitude
dc.subjectBohumil Hrabal
dc.subjectJosef Koudelka
dc.subjectInvasion of Czechoslovak
dc.titleRepression, literature, and the growth and metamorphosis of Czech national identity in the 20th century
dc.typeHonors
dc.description.degreeAB
dc.description.departmentHistory
dc.description.majorHistory
dc.description.advisorJohn Morrow, Jr.
dc.description.committeeJohn Morrow, Jr.
dc.description.committeeKatarzyna Jerzak


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