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dc.contributor.authorBingham, Kecia Lynee
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:21:18Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:21:18Z
dc.date.issued2009-12
dc.identifier.otherbingham_kecia_l_200912_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/bingham_kecia_l_200912_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/26009
dc.description.abstractAlthough emotional intelligence (EI) has been touted as a critical success factor for effective leadership there has been little evidence to support such strong claims and no research has reported the consequences of low EI on potential for derailment (PFD). This study used a real work sample to examine if dimensions of trait EI predict leadership/PFD ratings by direct reports. Gender differences in trait EI were found. Gender moderated the trait EI – leadership/PFD relationships. Contrary to claims, only intrapersonal trait EI benefited females and actually harmed male leaders in task-oriented leadership situations. Individual and organization level implications are provided.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectTrait Emotional Intelligence
dc.subjectLeadership
dc.subjectPotential for Derailment
dc.subjectSex Role Theory
dc.subjectGender Role Strain Paradigm
dc.subjectGender Stereotypes
dc.subjectEmotions
dc.subjectTask-Oriented Behavior
dc.subjectRelations-Oriented Behavior
dc.titleFemale advantage
dc.title.alternativea socio-emotional examination of leadership and potential for derailment
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorKarl Kuhnert
dc.description.committeeKarl Kuhnert
dc.description.committeeKecia Thomas
dc.description.committeeLillian Eby


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