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dc.contributor.authorStoike, Jeffrey James
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:20:42Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:20:42Z
dc.date.issued2009-08
dc.identifier.otherstoike_jeffrey_j_200908_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/stoike_jeffrey_j_200908_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25957
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines questions of conservation and development pertaining to the Ngöbe, an indigenous group in western Panama, with a focus on cacao (Theobroma cacao Linn.) agroforestry. A political ecology framework is applied to cacao agroforestry as sustainable development amongst the Ngöbe in a historical context. Through research based on both academic and grey literature, as well as an unpublished thesis, I discuss Ngöbe symbolic values of cacao in the context of conservation and development trends in the region. I make specific reference to the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor (MBC), a transnational conservation program which promotes cacao agroforestry in Ngöbe communities. I conclude that future conservation efforts should be directed towards the development of policies that enhance broader Ngöbe values for cacao and should not rely overwhelmingly on market-based criteria.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectcacao, agroforestry, sustainable development, Mesoamerican Biological Corridor
dc.subjectBocas del Toro
dc.subjectPanama
dc.subjectNgobe
dc.titleNgobe cultural values of cacao and sustainable development in western Panama
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentInstitute of Ecology
dc.description.majorEcology
dc.description.advisorCarl F. Jordan
dc.description.committeeCarl F. Jordan
dc.description.committeeJulie Velasquez Runk
dc.description.committeePaul Sutter


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