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dc.contributor.authorMacdonald, John Dalton
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:19:47Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:19:47Z
dc.date.issued2009-08
dc.identifier.othermacdonald_john_d_200908_ab
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/macdonald_john_d_200908_ab
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25875
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the prose style, genre, diction, and dramatic structures of Caesar’s commentaries on the Gallic and Civil War. The paper utilizes these elements in order to uncover the way in which Caesar used repetition and representation to validate and justify his own illegal actions. The repetition, contrast, selection, and sequence present a consistent argument about the causes of the war and who was responsible. Caesar considered it his duty to save the republic from the privatizing efforts of the Pompeians and therefore endeavored to generate hostile sentiments towards them in regards to the causes of the war. Caesar is willing to misrepresent facts and to distort episodes in order to achieve his goal of de-familiarizing and de-Romanizing Pompey, his commanders, and his army. This paper aims to prove that Caesar did not write as an indifferent reporter, but rather, as one motivated to save the republic and, even Rome itself, from the clutches of Pompey and his supporters.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectCaesar
dc.subjectCommentaries
dc.subjectCivil War
dc.subjectGallic War
dc.subjectrepetition
dc.subjectrepresentation
dc.subjectgenre
dc.titleCaesar's commentaries
dc.title.alternativea lesson in repetition and representation
dc.typeHonors
dc.description.degreeAB
dc.description.departmentClassics
dc.description.majorLatin
dc.description.advisorRobert Curtis
dc.description.committeeRobert Curtis
dc.description.committeeJames Anderson


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