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dc.contributor.authorLi, Hui
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:19:39Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:19:39Z
dc.date.issued2009-08
dc.identifier.otherli_hui_200908_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/li_hui_200908_phd
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25863
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, a growing number of states have adopted sales tax “holidays.” While a number of normative arguments about this policy have been advanced in the literature, very little empirical research has sought to understand policymakers’ motives and expectations or how the policy works in practice. This dissertation analyzes the sales tax holiday in Georgia. Using elite interviews, it investigates the motives of Georgia policymakers for adopting the sales tax holiday, as well as their expectations about the probable policy outcomes. Then, using state and county level sales and revenue data, policymakers’ expectations are compared with actual policy outcomes in an effort to better understand the extent to which expected and actual outcomes coincide. This research establishes that the motives for adoption of this policy are both economic and political, but that state policymakers are motivated more by political factors than economic factors. It also demonstrates that state policymakers view the holiday as good policy and successful in achieving its policy purposes. Using both political and economic criteria, the evaluation of the sales tax holiday in Georgia suggests that the policy has partially accomplished policymakers’ expectations: it does save taxpayers money but does not promote additional retail sales. The evaluation also suggests that, as expected by some policymakers, the sales tax holiday in Georgia is revenue neutral to local governments.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectSales tax, Sales tax holiday, Tax exemption, Retail sales, Tax incidence, Revenue, Georgia
dc.titleThe sales tax holiday in Georgia
dc.title.alternativepolicymakers’ motives and expectations and the actual effects
dc.typeDissertation
dc.description.degreePhD
dc.description.departmentPublic Administration and Policy
dc.description.majorPublic Administration
dc.description.advisorJerome Legge, Jr.
dc.description.advisorThomas Lauth
dc.description.committeeJerome Legge, Jr.
dc.description.committeeThomas Lauth
dc.description.committeeYilin Hou
dc.description.committeeDeborah Carroll


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