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dc.contributor.authorHoffman, Allen Maxwell
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:19:07Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:19:07Z
dc.date.issued2009-08
dc.identifier.otherhoffman_allen_m_200908_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/hoffman_allen_m_200908_ma
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25819
dc.description.abstractSince the sixteenth century, scholars have sought to understand why a historically free segment of the Roman world, the colonus, was apparently tied to the land by laws of the Theodosian Code. While many scholars have called this the birth of medieval serfdom and coined the term “colonate,” this conclusion cannot be supported by linguistic analysis of the term’s Latin etymon “colonatus,” and derives from deterministic historiography. Furthermore, many pertinent laws are suspect because they originate from the Code’s fifth and most incomplete book, which many supplement invalidly with laws from the Justinian Code. A passage from Letter 20*, one of Augustine’s new letters, provides compelling evidence for the continued mobility of coloni in Fussala, a fifth century North African town. By integrating Augustine’s new evidence with linguistic, historical and legal arguments, this thesis reinvigorates the long-debated topic of the late Roman colonus.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectcolonus
dc.subjectcolonate
dc.subjectAugustine
dc.subjectRoman North Africa
dc.subjectRoman Law
dc.subjectLate Antiquity
dc.subjectHistoriography
dc.titleAugustine's Letter 20*
dc.title.alternativecoloni in Fussala
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMA
dc.description.departmentClassics
dc.description.majorClassical Languages
dc.description.advisorErika Hermanowicz
dc.description.committeeErika Hermanowicz
dc.description.committeeNaomi Norman
dc.description.committeeRobert Curtis


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