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dc.contributor.authorFuhrman, Shane
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:18:54Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:18:54Z
dc.date.issued2009-08
dc.identifier.otherfuhrman_shane_a_200908_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/fuhrman_shane_a_200908_ms
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25802
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to get a better look at what information people look for and how they utilize it when voting for public office. Policy capturing was used to go beyond participants’ inaccurate insight as to what cues mattered when they were making voting decisions about “paper” candidates. Gender and ethnic biases were investigated as well as several other corollary variables to explain particular voting policies. Statistical analysis revealed numerous patterns in what cues matter to voters and how that information was utilized by the sample of 299 undergraduate students. In addition, implications of these patterns are discussed in light of the future of politics in America.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectVoting behavior, Bradley effect, lens model, policy capturing, politics, ethnicity, gender, political sophistication, political decision making
dc.titleWhat are voters really thinking?
dc.title.alternativea lens model approach to voting behavior
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMS
dc.description.departmentPsychology
dc.description.majorPsychology
dc.description.advisorRob Mahan
dc.description.committeeRob Mahan
dc.description.committeeKecia Thomas
dc.description.committeeChuck Lance


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