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dc.contributor.authorBerry, Ashley Maria
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T18:18:10Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T18:18:10Z
dc.date.issued2009-08
dc.identifier.otherberry_ashley_m_200908_mhp
dc.identifier.urihttp://purl.galileo.usg.edu/uga_etd/berry_ashley_m_200908_mhp
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10724/25740
dc.description.abstractThis thesis was written to celebrate and encourage the preservation of the American diner. The diner is a uniquely American cultural and architectural icon that will soon be lost without the intervention of historic preservation. Current diner preservation and restoration is typically performed by amateurs and enthusiasts who lack formal preservation education or training, which demonstrates a clear need for professional preservation assistance. As the diner regains a second wind in popularity, the need for formalized preservation strategies for diners will become apparent, and perhaps spark a movement in diner preservation. This thesis will examine the architectural and social histories of the diner, its need for historic preservation, and existing diners that have dealt with preservation in different ways.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisheruga
dc.rightspublic
dc.subjectDiner, Lunch Cart, Streamlined, Northeast, American
dc.titleMachines for eating
dc.title.alternativethe American diner
dc.typeThesis
dc.description.degreeMHP
dc.description.departmentSchool of Environmental Design
dc.description.majorHistoric Preservation
dc.description.advisorMark Reinberger
dc.description.committeeMark Reinberger
dc.description.committeeJohn C. Waters
dc.description.committeeDaniel Nadenicek


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